So about Camden NJ

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-06-04/how-camden-new-jersey-reformed-its-police-department?cmpid=socialflow-twitter-businessweek&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=socialflow-organic&utm_source=url_link&utm_content=businessweek

This was linked to me from someone I know, with a touch of laughter. Do not misunderstand me, what has been done these past few years has been a good thing. A decade ago Camden was I believe the worst city in the US for crime based on population. And now it is, I will say, better.

I am a 5-10 minute drive to Camden from my home. My mother, my aunts and uncles, my Grandmother, were all born there. On my birth certificate it lists Camden for place of birth. The neighborhood my family grew up in is mostly leveled now, burned out row homes from decades of violence and crime. Drugs were rampant with people driving in from nearby more affluent towns coming to make a quick score. Camden is the last stop before the train takes you into Philadelphia. It was home to RCA, and Campbell soup. It was a true blue collar town. Over years, those workers saved up and moved their families to nearby towns away from the factories. The population changed, property values dropped, crime and corruption increased.

So about 8-10 years ago they were at their last straw. The state had already taken over the school district and was pressuring the city about the police force. Keep in mind, the state was pumping millions into the city, and it just vanished. So they got rid of the police force….

As we new it

And in came the county police. Camden County is fairly large, so every town contributed towards the force. Now I will point out something to those believing this is a model for doing away with the police. If anything they doubled the force. Now you had patrol cars at all the major intersections, security cameras to watch hot spots, there was a massive crackdown on crime, open air drug deals, and its worked in a fashion, except it really didn’t.

What happened is all of those criminals, the ones looking for a quick score, didn’t have easy prey where they lived, so they hoped on the train, took a 5 minute ride one town up, then two, three, five. They started taking bikes from back yards, would risk checking a car for change. Eventually taking packages delivered in the day off front steps. So people here started putting in Ring doorbells and video surveillance, it helped a little. We all live here, our cars and homes locked up at night, alarm systems set. I am a block from the police station, and that has not been a deterrent from someone going through my car. I even saw a kid on a bike trying my car door one evening. He quickly rode up the street and was gone.

So when you are looking at disbanding your police, just keep in mind that you aren’t solving the problem, you’re pushing it on someone else.

4 thoughts on “So about Camden NJ

    1. As I read through some of the federal posturing and their bill I saw right through all of the smoke and mirrors. Their bill makes things like use of choke holds illegal “at the federal level” and offers “incentives” to states to adopt similar. Much like all of the Federal gun laws, the states can choose to ignore them. It is all posturing to deflect opinion away from their real view that nothing really needs to change at their level. It’s up to us to figure it out.

      If ever there was a disconnect from the American people we are seeing it now

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Honestly, I hadn’t bothered to review the bill itself because the legality of “choke holds” is currently irrelevant. While I am generally in favor of unions and collective bargaining, many of the police unions have negotiated agreements where it doesn’t matter.

        Disconnect is a good word. While I try my best to at least vote in an effort to exercise the tiny fraction of power allotted to me, the whole thing is designed to bury the minority opinion.

        For better or worse, I’ve been reading Milton Friedman’s Capitalism and Freedom, which for a book written in 1962 largely about economic policy, has some quotes that have hit surprisingly close to home.

        “Mistakes, excusable or not, cannot be avoided in a system which dispersed responsibility yet gives a few men great power, and which thereby makes important policy actions highly dependent on accidents of personality.”

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Yep, I agree. As far as Union contracts go, there is a legal battle brewing and I am sure lawyers are lining up to get a shot at going all the way to the Supreme Court. It will come down to whether or not the Federal Government can force a state to do something. Certainly we will see minor change, but anything as big as dissolving the entire police system would be years in courts

        Like

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